Your Next Draft

Alice Sudlow

Your Next Draft is the fiction writer's guide to developmental editing. What do you do after your first draft? How do you flesh out flat characters, fill in plot holes, and hook your readers from the first page to the last? What does editing a novel even mean? Developmental editor and book coach Alice Sudlow answers all these questions and more. Each week, she shares the editing strategies she's using with her one-on-one clients so you can put them to use in your own novel. Tune in for tips, tools, and step-by-step guides for the novel editing process.

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Why Writers Resist Measuring Their Craft (And Why You Shouldn’t)
1週間前
Why Writers Resist Measuring Their Craft (And Why You Shouldn’t)
What we get wrong about creativity—and the truth that will make your writing and editing so much more effective.Do you know how great stories work?Scratch that. Let’s start with an easier question. Do you know how your stories work?Not all writers do. Even published authors often struggle to articulate how they created the books their readers love. They rely on intuition, following gut feelings to shape their stories.But while your intuition can guide you to create a commercially successful novel . . .. . . I believe there’s a better way. An easier way. A less confusing and chaotic, more reliable and repeatable way.And that’s what this episode is all about.In it, you’ll learn:What we get wrong about our own creativityThe truth about writing and art that exceptionally successful writers (probably) don’t want you to knowWhat I find most amazing about traditional publishing (seriously, I think this is bonkers)And more!Your intuition is a powerful storytelling tool. But it’s not your only tool.And in this episode, I’ll show you why that’s such wonderful news.Links mentioned in the episode:Ep. 36: Your Story Has Deep Meaning. Do You Know What It Is?Ep. 42: The 6 Essential Elements of Every Novel, Act, and SceneP.S. What do you get when an editor and a nuclear physicist walk into a swing dance? Powerful truths about jazz music and storytelling, it turns out. Check out the episode to see what I mean.Support the showWant more editing tips and resources? Follow me on Instagram and Facebook.And if you're enjoying the podcast, would you mind leaving a rating and review on Apple Podcasts? That helps more writers find these editing resources. And it helps me know what's helpful to you so I can create more episodes you'll love!Loving the show? Show your support with a monthly contribution »
The Pros and Cons of Group Coaching for Writers
13-02-2024
The Pros and Cons of Group Coaching for Writers
Why group coaching might be the perfect way to get feedback on your writing.When I was first getting started, I pictured editing like this:A writer writes a manuscript and sends it to their editor. The editor writes feedback and sends it back. The writer takes that feedback and uses it to edit their manuscript.That’s the classic form of editing. But it’s far from the only form of editing.Editing doesn’t even have to be one-on-one. In fact, sometimes group coaching can be exactly what you need!In this episode, I’m breaking down the pros and cons of group coaching for writers.You’ll learn:How group coaching combines the best features of critique groups + one-on-one editingWhat you CAN’T learn one-on-one (but you can learn in a group!)One group coaching caveat to watch out forAnd more!Group coaching isn’t better than one-on-one editing, or vice versa. It’s just different—a different experience that can meet different needs in your writing in a different way.In fact, you might decide to try both group and one-on-one editing at different points in your writing career. So it’s great to know what your options are!Links mentioned in the episode:Join the Scene Mastery Workshop waitlist: alicesudlow.com/workshopSupport the showWant more editing tips and resources? Follow me on Instagram and Facebook.And if you're enjoying the podcast, would you mind leaving a rating and review on Apple Podcasts? That helps more writers find these editing resources. And it helps me know what's helpful to you so I can create more episodes you'll love!Loving the show? Show your support with a monthly contribution »
5 Steps to Edit the Second Draft of a Novel
30-01-2024
5 Steps to Edit the Second Draft of a Novel
The simple editing process to turn your messy first draft into a second draft you love.“I’ve written first drafts before, but I’ve never edited a second draft. How do you actually do it?”A writer asked me this a few days ago. And they’re not alone—it’s a question I hear a lot.How do you actually edit a novel? Is there a process? A system? A strategy? Something, anything, to guide you after you finish the first draft?Yes. Yes, there’s a process to edit a novel.Better yet, it’s a simple process. (That doesn’t mean it’s easy—don’t get those confused. But it’s not complicated.)And in this episode, I’ll walk you through this process step by step.You’ll learn:The 5-step editing process I use with all my one-on-one clientsHow to customize this process to make it work for YOUThe trap you risk falling into if you don’t use this processWhere the REAL work of developmental editing happens (hint: it’s not about changing the words in your manuscript!)Why this process will make your editing clearer, more effective, and more efficientAnd more!If you’ve ever felt lost, confused, daunted, or completely overwhelmed by the very idea of editing your novel——or if you’ve been editing, but you can’t tell whether you’re making progress or just spinning your wheels——then this episode is for you.Links mentioned in the episode:Work with me: alicesudlow.com/contactEp. 31: 3 Ways to Create a Scene List That Makes Your Editing Process (Almost) EasyStory Structure: The 6 Essential Elements of Every Novel, Act, and SceneCharacter Arcs: Three-Act or Four-Act Structure: Which Is Best for Your Novel?Theme: Your Story Has Deep Meaning. Do You Know What It Is?Point of View: The Most Important Principle When Choosing Your Point of ViewSupport the showWant more editing tips and resources? Follow me on Instagram and Facebook.And if you're enjoying the podcast, would you mind leaving a rating and review on Apple Podcasts? That helps more writers find these editing resources. And it helps me know what's helpful to you so I can create more episodes you'll love!Loving the show? Show your support with a monthly contribution »
What It REALLY Means to Make Progress Editing Your Novel
02-01-2024
What It REALLY Means to Make Progress Editing Your Novel
Editing progress doesn’t always look like you’d expect. Here’s how to recognize it.If your editing is going great, you’ll enjoy this episode. Honestly, though, if editing feels like the worst thing in the world right now, you’ll love this episode even more.Here’s what’s in store: How do you know whether you’re really making progress editing your novel?In the episode, you’ll learn:Why editing progress does NOT look like what you might expectWhat counts as editing progressThe two things that DON’T count as progressAnd more!If you’re feeling stuck, stagnant, or overwhelmed, don’t miss this episode.I hope it gives you just the boost you need to start this year of writing and editing strong.One more thing: This year, I’m moving Your Next Draft to a biweekly podcasting schedule. Rather than sharing a new episode every week, I’ll have a new episode every other week.I’m making this shift to allow me to spend more time with my editing clients. You’ll still get to hear from me on the podcast! I’ll still be sharing the same actionable editing content designed to help you navigate your own novel editing process.It’ll just be every other week rather than every week.To hear more about this shift, check out the episode.Links mentioned in the episode:Join my email list for weekly editing tips: alicesudlow.com/sceneworksheetJoin my waitlist and be the first to know about my openings for new editing clients: alicesudlow.com/waitlistSupport the showWant more editing tips and resources? Follow me on Instagram and Facebook.And if you're enjoying the podcast, would you mind leaving a rating and review on Apple Podcasts? That helps more writers find these editing resources. And it helps me know what's helpful to you so I can create more episodes you'll love!Loving the show? Show your support with a monthly contribution »
The Top 5 Lessons From Year 1 of Building My Editing Business
19-12-2023
The Top 5 Lessons From Year 1 of Building My Editing Business
Your editing process has more in common with building a business than you might think.Editing a novel and building a business . . . well, they’re actually not all that different.That’s something I’ve been thinking about all year. As I’ve coached writers through the editing process, I’ve been struck again and again by how similar novel editing and business building really are.After all, they’re both large creative projects. The kind that demand a lot: grit, perseverance, continual learning. And the kind that lead to incredible rewards for those with the courage to pursue them.Which means the lessons I’ve learned in this year of building my business also apply to you in your writing. (And I’ve learned a lot of things!)In this episode, I’m sharing five of my business-building lessons that will apply to your novel, too.You’ll learn:Why you might be closer to building your own business than you thinkMy #1 marketing tip for a business or a bookThe mistake I made at the beginning of my business and how I’m fixing it now (hint: frozen burritos may be delicious, but they are not entirely nutritious)And more!Your Next Draft is all about inviting you in to the editing tools and strategies I’m using in my own editing practice. And in this episode, I’m pulling back the curtain and getting a little more vulnerable than usual.I hope this inspires you to reflect on your year of writing and editing, too. What have you learned this year? What new editing wisdom are you taking into 2024?Links mentioned in the episode:For a podcast all about building an editing business, check out The Editing Podcast with Louise Harnby and Denise Cowle.Support the showWant more editing tips and resources? Follow me on Instagram and Facebook.And if you're enjoying the podcast, would you mind leaving a rating and review on Apple Podcasts? That helps more writers find these editing resources. And it helps me know what's helpful to you so I can create more episodes you'll love!Loving the show? Show your support with a monthly contribution »
The Top 5 Editing Tips From Your Next Draft in 2023
12-12-2023
The Top 5 Editing Tips From Your Next Draft in 2023
The year’s most popular editing tip, plus four more strategies I don’t want you to miss.What’s the best editing tip you’ve learned this year?If you’ve been listening to Your Next Draft all year, there are quite a few to pick from—fifty, in fact.So in this episode, I’m taking a look back at this year on Your Next Draft. I’ve selected the top five editing tips from 2023, tips you can put to use in your writing right away.In it, you’ll hear:The most popular editing tip from 2023The editing principle I use with every manuscript and every clientThe editing strategy a client pitched me (that has since become one of my favorite tools!)And more!It’s been a great year on the podcast. I can’t wait to share more editing strategies with you in 2024!Links mentioned in the episode:Get my Scene Analysis Worksheet: alicesudlow.com/sceneworksheetFind J.D. Edwin’s books: jdedwin.comEp. 8: What Is a Scene? The Ultimate Guide to Write and Edit Amazing ScenesEp. 23: 3 Simple Steps to Edit Absolutely Anything in Your NovelEp. 20: Listen in on a Real-Life Scene Edit with Author and Editor Kim KesslerEp. 33: The 3-Step Formula to Evoke Emotion and Make Your Readers FeelEp. 35: How to Create an Editing Process That Works for You With Author JD EdwinEp. 50: Use This One Editing Tip for Everything You WriteSupport the showWant more editing tips and resources? Follow me on Instagram and Facebook.And if you're enjoying the podcast, would you mind leaving a rating and review on Apple Podcasts? That helps more writers find these editing resources. And it helps me know what's helpful to you so I can create more episodes you'll love!Loving the show? Show your support with a monthly contribution »
My Biggest Takeaway From Coaching Writers in 2023
05-12-2023
My Biggest Takeaway From Coaching Writers in 2023
What dozens of manuscripts and dozens of writers all have in common.This weekend, I celebrated the one year anniversary of launching my editing business.And since the one year mark is a pretty major milestone, and we’re nearing the end of 2023, I’ve been looking back.I’ve edited dozens of novels and coached dozens of writers this year. And while the stories vary widely, there’s one theme I’ve encountered in them all—and it applies to your story, too.In this episode, I’m sharing what I’ve learned from a year of coaching writers and editing novels.You’ll hear:What new and experienced writers both have in commonWhy it’s helpful to you and me when I share everything I know about editing here on the podcastWhy all the writing craft resources in the world can’t put editors out of businessAnd more!It’s been a wonderful year of editing, full of amazing stories and equally amazing writers. And I can’t wait to see what 2024 has in store!Links mentioned in the episode:Want me to edit your novel? Reach out and tell me about your story: alicesudlow.com/contactSupport the showWant more editing tips and resources? Follow me on Instagram and Facebook.And if you're enjoying the podcast, would you mind leaving a rating and review on Apple Podcasts? That helps more writers find these editing resources. And it helps me know what's helpful to you so I can create more episodes you'll love!Loving the show? Show your support with a monthly contribution »
How to Make Sure Even Your "Slow" Scenes Keep Your Readers Hooked
28-11-2023
How to Make Sure Even Your "Slow" Scenes Keep Your Readers Hooked
Four questions to make every scene of your novel un-put-down-able.Some of your scenes are really exciting. They’re the big ones, the reasons why your readers picked up your book: the first kiss, the epic battle, the discovery of the body.And some of your scenes . . . well, they’re the stuff that happens in between the exciting scenes.In those scenes, the story slows down. Sometimes it slows down a lot. To glacial pace. To “eh, maybe I’ll finish reading this later” pace.How do you keep your readers hooked? How do you keep them turning pages even during the scenes that are action-light and exposition-heavy?In this episode, I’ll walk you through four questions to make sure even your “slow” scenes are un-put-down-able.You’ll learn:How to evaluate whether a “slow” scene is even necessary—or if you can cut it entirelyThe 4-step process to edit your “slow” scenes to keep your readers hooked2 things every “slow” scene needsAnd more!Your story is worth reading from cover to cover. Here’s how to make sure you don’t lose your readers during a dull moment midway through.Links mentioned in the episode:Get the Scene Analysis Worksheet: alicesudlow.com/sceneworksheetSee whether I’m the right editor for you: alicesudlow.com/contactEp. 27: Value Shifts: How to Craft Compelling Change in Every StoryEp. 11: How to Edit a Scene of a Novel, Part 1Ep. 42: The 6 Essential Elements of Every Novel, Act, and SceneSupport the showWant more editing tips and resources? Follow me on Instagram and Facebook.And if you're enjoying the podcast, would you mind leaving a rating and review on Apple Podcasts? That helps more writers find these editing resources. And it helps me know what's helpful to you so I can create more episodes you'll love!Loving the show? Show your support with a monthly contribution »
How to Figure Out What Your Character REALLY Wants
21-11-2023
How to Figure Out What Your Character REALLY Wants
Make your readers care about your story by getting specific about what your protagonist wants—and why.What does your protagonist want?I bet you have an answer for that question. I also bet that your answer is a little . . . generic.See, the thing your protagonist wants is good. They might want to save a victim from a villain, or fall in love, or get a promotion, or solve a mystery. We all agree those are good things to want.But that doesn’t move us, doesn’t make us care about your protagonist and their goal, unless we know why they want it.So in this episode, we’re digging in deep to find out not only what your character wants, but why they want it.You’ll learn:The one question I love to ask to figure out what your character really wantsWhy generic wants won’t move your readersHow to make your story stand out from the crowd by getting specificAnd more!You might just discover new layers to your character you didn’t even know were there.Links mentioned in the episode:Get the Character Arc Worksheet: alicesudlow.com/characterworksheetEp. 21: How to Identify Your Protagonist's Want and Need (And Why Those Matter to Your Plot)Support the showWant more editing tips and resources? Follow me on Instagram and Facebook.And if you're enjoying the podcast, would you mind leaving a rating and review on Apple Podcasts? That helps more writers find these editing resources. And it helps me know what's helpful to you so I can create more episodes you'll love!Loving the show? Show your support with a monthly contribution »
Behind the Scenes of a Deep Dive Manuscript Evaluation
14-11-2023
Behind the Scenes of a Deep Dive Manuscript Evaluation
The 7 layers of analysis I use to edit a fourth draft of a novel.I don’t know about you, but right now, my schedule is full. My days are packed with editing. I have several manuscripts I’m absolutely loving on my desk right now, so many pages to read, and so many notes to share with writers.With all this editing, I didn’t have time to put together a typical episode of Your Next Draft for you. So . . . I’m doing something a little different today.I’ve decided to pull back the curtain on the editing I’m doing right now, this week, on the manuscript I’m currently reading.In this episode, you’ll get a glimpse of how I think about a manuscript as I edit it. You’ll see:The 7 (yes, 7!) levels of analysis I’m applying as I readThe stage of the editing process this manuscript is inHow I know what levels of editing are right for this manuscript at this stageThe things I’m not editing in this manuscript right nowThat I really, really, really love editing (so much that I peaked on the mic a few times as I recorded. Sorry!)And more!If you’ve ever wondered what a developmental editor is thinking when they’re editing a novel . . .. . . well, this is it. These are my thoughts, almost in-the-moment, as I edit a manuscript I’m loving.Huge shoutout to author J. D. Edwin, whose manuscript this episode is about, and who gave me the all clear to share a glimpse at our process together. She’ll be delighted if you check out her books at jdedwin.com. They’re really good books. (Yes, I’m a bit biased, because I edited them. But still. They’re really good.)Links mentioned in the episode:Check out J. D. Edwin’s books: jdedwin.comListen to J. D. talk about her editing process: How to Create an Editing Process That Works for You With Author JD EdwinSee whether I’m the right editor for your novel: alicesudlow.com/wishlistReach out and let’s talk editing your novel: alicesudlow.com/contactSupport the showWant more editing tips and resources? Follow me on Instagram and Facebook.And if you're enjoying the podcast, would you mind leaving a rating and review on Apple Podcasts? That helps more writers find these editing resources. And it helps me know what's helpful to you so I can create more episodes you'll love!Loving the show? Show your support with a monthly contribution »
How to Flesh Out Flat Characters With Just 4 Questions
07-11-2023
How to Flesh Out Flat Characters With Just 4 Questions
The minimum viable character questionnaire to develop all your side characters.How do you flesh out a flat character? Create a cast your readers will fall in love with? Make each character realistic, well-developed, and believable?There are tons of character development questionnaires and personality tests and character sketch templates out there.They’ll ask you everything from “What’s your character’s deepest fear?” to “What’s their hair color?” to “What toppings do they most hate on pizza?”But you don’t need all those questions in order to create a richly-developed character. Truly, you don’t.In this episode, I’m sharing the shortest possible character development exercise.I call it the Minimum Viable Character Development Questionnaire. (There are more words in that title than questions in the questionnaire.)You’ll learn:The 4 essential questions you need to answer to flesh out any characterThe most important element of characterizationHow to give a flat, unremarkable cast of side characters unique and memorable personalitiesAnd more!Links mentioned in the episode:Get the Character Arc Worksheet: alicesudlow.com/characterworksheetEp. 18: 2 Essential Questions to Craft a Compelling Character ArcEp. 21: How to Identify Your Protagonist's Want and Need (And Why Those Matter to Your Plot)Support the showWant more editing tips and resources? Follow me on Instagram and Facebook.And if you're enjoying the podcast, would you mind leaving a rating and review on Apple Podcasts? That helps more writers find these editing resources. And it helps me know what's helpful to you so I can create more episodes you'll love!Loving the show? Show your support with a monthly contribution »
What NOT to Say to Your Developmental Editor
24-10-2023
What NOT to Say to Your Developmental Editor
How to make the most of your editor’s feedback—even if you disagree with it.If you want to make the most of your editor’s feedback, there’s one phrase not to say.It’s natural. It’s normal. It’s something I’ve definitely said in other areas of my life.But when you’re collaborating with an editor to make your novel the best it can be, this phrase won’t help you.And in this episode, I’m sharing what this pesky phrase is and why it’s so dangerous.You’ll learn:One thing not to say to your editor—and what to say instead3 reasons why we want to say the wrong thingThe qualities my best editing clients all share (hint: it’s not about their story or their skill!)And more!If you’ve ever wondered how to make the most of working with an editor, this episode is for you. I hope it makes it a little easier—and more exciting!—to get an editor’s feedback.Links mentioned in this episode:Find out more about my editing: alicesudlow.comSee my editing services: alicesudlow.com/servicesSee whether I’m a good fit for your novel: alicesudlow.com/wishlistReach out and let’s chat about whether your novel is a good fit for me: alicesudlow.com/contactSupport the showWant more editing tips and resources? Follow me on Instagram and Facebook.And if you're enjoying the podcast, would you mind leaving a rating and review on Apple Podcasts? That helps more writers find these editing resources. And it helps me know what's helpful to you so I can create more episodes you'll love!Loving the show? Show your support with a monthly contribution »
Use This One Editing Tip for Everything You Write
17-10-2023
Use This One Editing Tip for Everything You Write
How to developmentally edit absolutely ANY piece of writing.There’s an editing tip that applies to literally every kind of writing.Bold statement, I know. But I stand by it.Actually, “tip” is understating the matter. This “tip” is actually a mission-critical principle. It’s essential to every writing project.Also, it’s my current favorite writing and editing tool. Lately, I’ve been using this every single time I sit down to write something new, and every time I open up a draft to edit.What is this writing tip, you ask? Well, that's the topic of this episode.In the episode, you’ll learn:4 problems you’ll face when you don’t use this tip3 ways this tip will make your writing better (and easier!)Why this tip might be so darn hard to actually apply (hint: it’s fear)How I used this exact tip to write this podcast episodeAnd more! (Like, you know, what the tip is!)This episode is extra-special—and not just because I love this editing tip.Today, Your Next Draft hits a major milestone: fifty episodes!Would you celebrate with me by leaving a rating and review?Here’s how:If you’re using an Apple device, tap right here to open the podcast.Scroll down nearly to the bottom.Tap the number of stars you’d like to give.Write a quick review. Even one sentence means a lot!If you’re not using an Apple device, feel free to send me an email at alice@alicesudlow.com and tell me what you love about the podcast. We’ll have a party in my email inbox!Here’s to fifty more! 🎉Links mentioned in the episode:Join my email list and get my free guide to edit your novel: alicesudlow.com/10stepsEp. 36: Your Story Has Deep Meaning. Do You Know What It Is?Support the showWant more editing tips and resources? Follow me on Instagram and Facebook.And if you're enjoying the podcast, would you mind leaving a rating and review on Apple Podcasts? That helps more writers find these editing resources. And it helps me know what's helpful to you so I can create more episodes you'll love!Loving the show? Show your support with a monthly contribution »
[BONUS EP] How to Choose the Right Writing Resources for YOU Right Now, Part 2
11-10-2023
[BONUS EP] How to Choose the Right Writing Resources for YOU Right Now, Part 2
A simple decision-making framework to help you find YOUR best writing path.Yesterday, I shared a framework to help you make any decision about your writing career.Well—yesterday, I shared part one of that framework.And today, I’m back on the podcast with part two!In yesterday’s episode, I coached you through how to identify your values in your writing. What’s truly important to you?And in today’s episode, I’ll coach you through identifying your needs. What do you need most in your writing, editing, and publishing process right now?When you know what you value and what you need, making decisions about your writing journey becomes almost easy.You’ll know what courses you need. What book professionals you want to hire. What specific areas of learning and development you want to focus on.Ready for complete clarity about your writing journey? Check out the episode.Links mentioned in the episode:Join Notes to Novel: alicesudlow.com/notestonovelEp. 48: How to Choose the Right Writing Resources for YOU Right Now, Part 1Support the showWant more editing tips and resources? Follow me on Instagram and Facebook.And if you're enjoying the podcast, would you mind leaving a rating and review on Apple Podcasts? That helps more writers find these editing resources. And it helps me know what's helpful to you so I can create more episodes you'll love!Loving the show? Show your support with a monthly contribution »
How to Choose the Right Writing Resources for YOU Right Now, Part 1
10-10-2023
How to Choose the Right Writing Resources for YOU Right Now, Part 1
How to answer the question, “When should I work with an editor?”Hire an editor. Join a writing course. Work with a book coach. Gather beta readers. Join a writing group.There are so many resources to help you write and edit an amazing novel.This is great news when you know exactly what resource you need. If you need a very specific type of support, I can almost guarantee that it exists.But it’s terrible news when you don’t know what you need. When you don’t know what to look for, all the options are just overwhelming.So what’s the solution? How do you cut through the overwhelm and find the perfect writing resource for you, right now, at this very moment in your writing career?Well, that’s what I’m covering in this episode.I’m going to walk you through my favorite decision-making framework. It’s the answer I give anytime someone asks, “How do I know when to hire an editor?”And it will help you make any decision in your entire writing career (and maybe in life, too!).Plus, I’ll show you exactly how to use this framework in a real-life example, a decision you get to make right now:Should you join Notes to Novel before the doors close this Thursday?I won’t tell you whether you should join or not. That’s up to you.What I will do is help you discover what’s most important to you. Then, I’ll show you whether Notes to Novel is a good fit for that.Think of this episode as a one-on-one coaching session with me where I’ll help you figure out whether the Notes to Novel course is right for you.There’s no one right answer here. Just a process of discernment you can use for this decision—and every decision you make about your writing journey.Links mentioned in the episode:Join Notes to Novel: alicesudlow.com/notestonovelSupport the showWant more editing tips and resources? Follow me on Instagram and Facebook.And if you're enjoying the podcast, would you mind leaving a rating and review on Apple Podcasts? That helps more writers find these editing resources. And it helps me know what's helpful to you so I can create more episodes you'll love!Loving the show? Show your support with a monthly contribution »
Scene Structure: How the 6 Elements of Story Work in the First Scene of How to Train Your Dragon
03-10-2023
Scene Structure: How the 6 Elements of Story Work in the First Scene of How to Train Your Dragon
See the masterful story structure that undergirds the opening scene of How to Train Your Dragon.Great stories are built on great story structure. And my favorite story structure framework is one that you can apply on every level of story.It’s called the six elements of story, and it’s an editing tool you can use on every layer of your story.To prove it, I’m doing a deep dive into the structure of How to Train Your Dragon. First, I broke down the six elements of the movie as a whole. Then, I took a closer look at the first act of the movie.And in this episode, I’m breaking down the opening scene.You’ll learn:The essential value shifts that change from the start of the scene to the endThe critical, life-or-death choice Hiccup must make in the very first scene of the movieHow that choice sets up everything to comeAnd more!Want more? You can see my full analysis of How to Train Your Dragon all on one spreadsheet. Go to alicesudlow.com/dragon to get the spreadsheet.Then, go find the six elements of story in your scenes!Links mentioned in the episode:Watch the opening scene of How to Train Your DragonWatch the resolution of the opening sceneGet the full How to Train Your Dragon analysis: alicesudlow.com/dragonEp. 27: Value Shifts: How to Craft Compelling Change in Every StoryEp. 42: The 6 Essential Elements of Every Novel, Act, and SceneEp. 43: Why the 6 Elements of Story Are the Key to All Great StoriesEp. 45: How the 6 Elements of Story Work in How to Train Your DragonEp. 46: How the 6 Elements of Story Work in Act 1 of How to Train Your DragonSupport the showWant more editing tips and resources? Follow me on Instagram and Facebook.And if you're enjoying the podcast, would you mind leaving a rating and review on Apple Podcasts? That helps more writers find these editing resources. And it helps me know what's helpful to you so I can create more episodes you'll love!Loving the show? Show your support with a monthly contribution »
Act Structure: How the 6 Elements of Story Work in Act 1 of How to Train Your Dragon
26-09-2023
Act Structure: How the 6 Elements of Story Work in Act 1 of How to Train Your Dragon
The story structure that makes the first act of How to Train Your Dragon work.One of my favorite things about the six elements of story structure is the fact that they work everywhere.You can use them to structure your entire novel. You can use them to structure each act. And you can use them to structure each scene.And to prove it, I’m breaking down the first act of How to Train Your Dragon to show you the six elements at work.You’ll learn:What values shift in the first act (and why those changes are good and bad)The crisis choice Hiccup must make, and the many risks at stakeHow the inciting incident and resolution make the value shifts crystal clearAnd more!Plus, you can get my full spreadsheet analyzing How to Train Your Dragon at alicesudlow.com/dragon.Links mentioned in the episode:Get the full How to Train Your Dragon analysis: alicesudlow.com/dragonWatch the opening scene of How to Train Your DragonEp. 45: How the 6 Elements of Story Work in How to Train Your DragonEp. 27: Value Shifts: How to Craft Compelling Change in Every StorySupport the showWant more editing tips and resources? Follow me on Instagram and Facebook.And if you're enjoying the podcast, would you mind leaving a rating and review on Apple Podcasts? That helps more writers find these editing resources. And it helps me know what's helpful to you so I can create more episodes you'll love!Loving the show? Show your support with a monthly contribution »